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American Textile History Museum Announces Launch of The Chace Catalogue Online Collections

For Immediate Release:
Contact: Lois Frankenberger, publicist
978.470.0040
lfrankenberger@comcast.net

2005 ATHM Gala

Malcolm & Elizabeth Chace were honored at the 2005
Gala and Community Service Awards for their
continued generosity, leadership and support of
The American Textile History Museum.

LOWELL, (June 14, 2006) – In a move to use technology to bring its collections online for scholars and interested individuals, the American Textile History Museum is pleased to announce the launch of The Chace Catalogue. The project, which got underway two years ago, is sponsored by The Chace Foundation of Providence, Rhode Island.

According to ATHM’s executive director James S. Coleman, approximately 600 objects from the Museum’s collections of textiles, decorative arts, tools, machinery and workplace artifacts are now available for viewing online. “This is a bold step forward for the Museum as a national presence,” said Coleman. “Our gratitude goes to the Chace Foundation for enabling the Museum to share our unparalleled collections. Now, website visitors will have access to key portions of our curatorial and storage facilities through the technology of a virtual museum.”

Elizabeth and Malcolm Chace are dedicated philanthropists and longtime Museum supporters. Mr. Chace has been a member of the ATHM Board of Advisors since 1995, and is president and director of the Chace Foundation which supports a variety of organizations in the areas of arts, education, health, human services, religion and the environment.

The Chace Catalogue can be found at www.athm.org under the “Collections” tab. Deborah-Ann Giusti, coordinator & cataloguer of the Chace Project said that the new online collections database is in the pilot phase of the online catalogue project. “We will continue to add records to the online database as soon as they are ready for public viewing,” she said.

The American Textile History Museum tells America’s story through the art, history and science of our textiles. It is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive textile museum, and is located in the Kitson factory, built in 1860 to manufacture textile machinery.

The Museum is home to the most significant integrated textile history collection in North America, with an extraordinary library and one of the world’s largest and most important publicly held collections of tools, spinning wheels and hand looms. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers has designated its industrial machinery as a National Historic Engineering Heritage Collection. Its collections of books and documents, tools and textile machinery, fabric samples, textiles, and costumes come to life in the Textiles in America core exhibition, special exhibitions, and educational programs.

The Museum was founded in North Andover, MA in 1960 by Caroline Stevens Rogers, a hand-weaver and collector, and has been accredited by the American Association of Museums since 1973. Growing from a small regional facility to a nationally recognized cultural institution, the Museum moved to historic Lowell in 1997 to better serve the public.

The Museum continues its annual fundraising efforts to support the Museum’s ongoing operations, collections, development of new exhibitions, hands-on learning in the Textile Learning Center (TLC) and educational programs which serve over 8,500 area grade school students.

Exhibits and TLC are open during regular Museum hours. Admission is $8 for adults; $6 for seniors, college students, children 6-16, and groups; free for children under 6 and Museum members.

The Museum, an Editors’ Choice in the 2006 edition of the Yankee Magazine Travel Guide to New England, is located at 491 Dutton Street in Lowell, adjacent to the Lowell National Historical Park, 35 miles north of Boston off Route I-495. The building is wheelchair accessible, and parking is free. Telephone 978-441-0400.

Visit The Chace Catalogue NOW
or use the link under the & #8220;Collections” tab.

Long- time Museum supporter and friend Samuel S. Rogers of North Andover was recognized with a plaque in appreciation of his years of service to the Museum

At the recently held Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees of the American Textile History Museum, Samuel S. Rogers of North Andover was recognized with a plaque in appreciation of his years of service to the Museum. Rogers, a former president of the Museum, has stepped down as Trustee after serving in that capacity from 1969 – 2006.

Samuel S. Rogers

Samuel S. Rogers

His mother was Caroline Stevens Rogers, an accomplished hand spinner. Her father’s magnificent collection of early spinning and weaving tools was the impetus for her founding the Museum in 1960 in North Andover. In addition to his dedication to the Museum, Rogers has distinguished himself in the Boston area for his unselfish devotion to community service. He is continuing his association with the Museum as a member of the Board of Advisors for a three-year term.

“Textile Open” Mini-Golf Fundraiser a Huge Success

Thursday June 21st the 2nd annual “Textile Open” mini-golf fundraiser was held at the American Textile History Museum. The tournament style play was originally developed by avid golfer and Museum President & CEO Jim Coleman and this year’s event was co-hosted by the Museums new neighbor The Sun Charities. The Sun Charities effort was graciously spearheaded by The Sun’s Chairman of the Board, Kendall Wallace.

Ken Wallace Golf Event

Event co-host Kendall Wallace gives some pointers
to the foursome from Butler Bank.

Over 50 players came dressed in sporty golf attire brandishing their favorite putter and were announced US Open style with a bullhorn as they teed off. All the players reported they had a great time on the 18-hole par 72 course that wove its way through the Museum and Sun’s new offices. The champions trophy will be engraved with the name Jeff White a Butler Bank intern who shot a 74 on the tricky layout. Jeff collected the top prize of a new TaylorMade Putter.

This event raised more than $21,000. for the Museum and The Sun Charities.

Ken Wallace Golf Event

Last year’s winner Michael Creasy (right) poses with
the rest of his team (l to r) Sue Andrews, Bill Haddad,
Peter Aucella, and Larry Ardito.

Generous hole sponsors for the evening included, Ames Textile Corporation, The Behrakis Foundation, Lowell 5¢ Savings Bank, Trinity Ambulance, Courier Corporation, Middlesex Community College, Loft Properties, Lowell General Hospital, Nancy & Richard Donahue, Enterprise Bank, Mill City Management, Picard Construction, Rath Young & Pignatelli, Sun Charities, Alan Kazanjian, and Kenneth J. McAvoy.

Thank you to all sponsors, players and participants for a truly successful event.  See you on the course again next year.

American Textile History Museum Launches $1 Million Challenge to Grow Endowment for Its Collections

In a grass roots effort to grow its endowment and ensure the preservation of its collections, The American Textile History Museum (ATHM) has launched Caring for Collections: The $1 Million Challenge.

“The Museum is home to the most significant textile history collection in North America, with an extraordinary library and one of the world’s largest and most important publicly held collections of tools, spinning wheels and hand looms,” said Jim Coleman, the Museum’s Executive Director. “We have more than 5 million pieces of textile prints, fabric samples, rolled textiles, coverlets and costumes, and the work of acquisition, preservation, and exhibition of the collections is a major expense for the Museum. This effort to increase our endowment is specifically targeted towards the long term preservation of the collections so that Americans and others throughout the world can understand the important contributions textiles have made and continue to make to the fabric of American lives,” he said.

According to Coleman, The Maine Community Foundation (MCF) which has offered to match the $1 million raised at the Museum dollar for dollar, requires the Museum to raise $1 million by December 31, 2006 in order to receive the match.

“This is a short time frame and a sizable amount of money,” said Coleman. “Therefore, large and small gifts are needed to meet this goal. The collections are at the core of our mission to tell America’s story through the art, science, and history of our textiles, and the Museum needs everyone’s help in this grass roots effort to ensure that the collections are sustained for present and future generations of textile enthusiasts,” he said.

To pledge or make a gift, phone Maura Ryan in the development office at 978-441-0400, ext. 247, or visit the Museum’s website, www.athm.org.

The American Textile History Museum tells America’s story through the art, history and science of our textiles. It is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive textile museum, and is located in the Kitson factory, built in 1860 to manufacture textile machinery.

The Museum is home to a nationally renowned collection of books and documents, tools and textile machinery, fabric samples, textiles, and costumes. Its collections come to life in the Textiles in Americacore exhibition, special exhibitions, and educational programs.

The Museum was founded in North Andover, MA in 1960 by Caroline Stevens Rogers, a hand-weaver and collector, and has been accredited by the American Association of Museums since 1973. Growing from a small regional facility to a nationally recognized cultural institution, the Museum moved to historic Lowell in 1997 to better serve the public.

The Museum continues its annual fundraising efforts to support the Museum’s ongoing operations, collections, development of new exhibitions, hands-on learning in the Textile Learning Center (TLC) and educational programs which serve over 8,500 area grade school students.

Exhibits and TLC are open during regular Museum hours. Admission is $8 for adults; $6 for seniors, college students, children 6-16, and groups; free for children under 6 and Museum members.

The Museum, an Editors’ Choice in the 2006 edition of the Yankee Magazine Travel Guide to New England, is located at 491 Dutton Street in Lowell, adjacent to the Lowell National Historical Park, 35 miles north of Boston off Route I-495. The building is wheelchair accessible, and parking is free. Telephone 978-441-0400. Web: www.athm.org.

Caring for Collections: The $1 Million Challenge

Q&A

Why are the collections important? 
The American Textile History Museum (ATHM) is home to the most significant integrated textile history collection in North America, with an extraordinary library and one of the world’s largest and most important publicly held collections of tools, spinning wheels and hand looms. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers has designated our industrial machinery as a National Historic Engineering Heritage Collection.

The collections are at the core of our mission to tell America’s story through the art, science, and history of our textiles.

The clothing collection includes apparel and accessories from notable men and women, including former Congresswoman Helen Delich Bentley and jazz singer Peggy Cone, while the primary focus of the collection is on everyday clothes and the stories of those who wore them. Our textile collection includes the Edie and Stan Ross Collection of American Coverlets, and the Martha Bayles Boyd Collection of paisley shawls. Approximately 5 million samples are part of the textile collection as well as an extensive collection of yard goods, coverlets, and other household items.

The Osborne Library for textile history research contains a unique and comprehensive collection of over 40,000 printed items, 46,000 images, and over 770 collections of business records and manuscripts.

Our renowned collections are featured in the core exhibition, Textiles in America, and in our school and scout programs, and special exhibitions. The staff is in the process of making significant portions of the collections available to the public on the internet.

Our experienced curators and librarians develop the collections by acquiring new objects and overseeing their care. The work of acquisition, preservation, and exhibition of the collections is a major expense for the Museum. By increasing the endowment, we will increase the interest funds available for this important and necessary work.

Who can help? 
The Museum needs everyone’s help in this grass roots effort to grow its endowment, and ensure that the collections are preserved and sustained for present and future generations of textile enthusiasts. Large and small gifts are needed to reach our goal of $1 million, and to receive a $1 million match.

What is the $1 million match?
The Maine Community Foundation (MCF) has offered to match the $1 million raised at the Museum. This is a wonderful opportunity for the ATHM to double its money from this $1 million campaign for the care of the collections. In order to take advantage of this offer, the Museum must raise $1 million by December 31, 2006. A fund at the MCF, called the American Textile History Museum Fund has been established and designated to benefit the ATHM operations and collections in perpetuity.

How is the endowment fund managed? 
The $1 million raised at the ATHM will be managed by our professional fund managers as part of our restricted permanent endowment. The $1 million in matching funds held at the Maine Community Foundation (MCF) will be permanently invested in the American Textile History Museum Fund managed by the MCF. Interest from these two permanently restricted funds, estimated at a total of $100,000 per year, can be used for operations and the care of the ATHM collections.

What is the time frame for raising the matching funds? 
The Museum has a short period of time to meet the $1 million challenge since matching funds must be committed no later than December 31, 2006.

How do I donate? 
There are three easy and convenient ways to donate.
1. Click on Donate Now at the Museum’s website.

2. Make check payable & mail to:
“ATHM MCF Match”
491 Dutton Street
Lowell, MA 01854

3. Phone Maura Ryan in the development office at 978-441-0400, ext. 247.

How can I get more information? 
Contact Director of Advancement, Linda Carpenter ext. 241.

Please Join Us in Welcoming Our New Director, Jim Coleman!

James “Jim” Coleman, lifelong resident of New England began his long and esteemed textile career in 1973 at Forté Cashmere Company in Woonsocket, RI as a production intern. As the business grew both domestically and internationally, Coleman worked his way up mastering a variety of company functions, ultimately becoming President and CEO.

James Coleman

James Coleman

During his time at Forte, Coleman accumulated valuable business operations and international trade skills and experience. Coleman gathered technical expertise in the areas of wool and specialty fiber scouring, cashmere and specialty fiber de-hairing and combing, woolen and worsted spinning, knowledge of knitting, weaving as well as garment making.

His responsibilities regularly took him to the textile centers of Italy, UK, Germany and France as well as supply sources in Russia, Hungary, Czech Republic and other East Europe countries. Coleman traveled to China and Mongolia more than 50 times since these countries controlled more than 85% of the world’s cashmere supply. Coleman established joint venture projects in both China and Mongolia and was a member of the Board of Directors of the US/Mongolia Business Council.

An expert in cashmere and other natural fibers including wool, he has been a long-time member of the National Textile Association and currently serves as technical consultant to the Boston, MA based Cashmere & Camel Hair Manufacturers Institute (CCMI). He spoke as an expert panel member before the Federal Trade Commission on garment mislabeling. Coleman holds a degree in Business Management from Boston College. He resides in Holliston, MA with his wife Marguerite (Peggy), a registered nurse and together they have raised four children, Sarah, Michael, Meghan and Andrew.

American Textile History Museum’s Annual Gala Benefit and 2005 Community Service Awards on Friday, October 28th.

This year’s event drew over 150 guests and raised more than $70,000 to benefit ATHM’s programs and services. The evening featured a reception and a special viewing of the newly opened “Finishing Touches” exhibition, followed by dinner and dancing to the music of Bo Winiker and his Orchestra and the presentation of the museum’s annual Community Service Award. Attire was black-tie optional and guests were encouraged to wear their favorite accessories as “finishing touches.” As you can see in some of these pictures, guests did just that!

Thanks to all who participated for helping make a truly special event!

2005 Annual Gala 1Liz & Kim Chace hold the Community Service Award – a crystal circle, bearing the Museum logo – for their exemplary volunteer service, compassion and involvement. 2005 Annual Gala 2Pictured at the reception are from left Larry Ardito of Andover, John Matson also of Andover, Diana and Fred Russo of North Andover.
2005 Annual Gala 3Pictured during the reception are from left Judge Barbara Pearson of Lowell; Grace Becker of North Andover, Molly Booth of Newton, Peggy Palm of Tyngsboro, and CSA Award honoree Liz Chace of Providence, R.I. 2005 Annual Gala 4Pictured at one of the displays in the Finishing Touches exhibit are from left Denise and Joseph McManus of North Andover, and Jeanne and Robert Gable of North Andover.
2005 Annual Gala 5Pictured before dinner, Dracut residents Karen Herbaugh, ATHM curator and husband Dick Dubois, ATHM building supervisor, at one of the “Finishing Touches” displays. 2005 Annual Gala 6During dinner, Jan Haddad of Billerica dances with Larry Ardito of Andover to the music of Bo Winiker and his Orchestra.
2005 Annual Gala 7Museum President Michael Smith with Trustee Jock Pearson & The Honorable Barbara Pearson. 2005 Annual Gala 8“Finishing Touches” sponsors Hiram Samel, and Frank and Marlene Marchilena at the exhibit entrance.

Photos by Frank J. Leone, Jr.

American Textile Hall of Fame Class of 2005 Honored at September 12 Induction Ceremony

(September 13, 2005) — In a tribute to America’s spirit of enterprise, three industry leaders were inducted yesterday into the American Textile Hall of Fame. The program, now in its fifth year, is housed at the American Textile History Museum, where the Hall of Fame’s board of governors and the Museum’s board of trustees hosted a luncheon and induction ceremony celebrating the honorees.

From left: Robert Jackson, Cornelius (Buck) Vander Weele, Adrian Scalamandre Bitter and her son, and Robert F. Scalamandré Bitter

From left: Robert Jackson, Cornelius (Buck) Vander Weele,
Adrian Scalamandre Bitter and her son, and Robert F. Scalamandré Bitter

Inducted to the Class of 2005 were: Robert C. Jackson, past director of the National Cotton Council’s Washington, D.C. office and former executive vice president/CEO of the American Textile Manufacturers Institute; the Saco-Lowell Shops, formed in 1912 from three small machine shops – the Lowell Machine Shop in Lowell, the Pettee Machine Shop in Newton, and the Saco Water Power Company in Biddeford. – that led the industry in textile machine manufacturing, and continues as the Saco-Lowell Parts, LLC, to service its machinery worldwide; and Scalamandré Silks, producers of some of the finest reproduction and original designs in fabrics and wallpaper for homes and public buildings including the White House, that was founded in 1929 in Long Island, New York by engineer and Italian immigrant Franco Scalamandré (d. 1988), with designer and wife, Flora (d. 1987), and achieved national recognition by the historic preservation movement.

Accepting the awards were: Robert Jackson of Clemson, SC; Cornelius (Buck) Vander Weele, former president/CEO, Saco-Lowell, of Naples, FL; second and third generation Scalamandré family members Adrian Scalamandre Bitter and her son, who is the firm’s co-president, Robert F. Scalamandré Bitter, of New York. (pictured above).

The American Textile Hall of Fame, established in 2001 with a board of governors appointed by the Museum’s board of trustees, honors past and present individuals, corporations and institutions that have made significant contributions to the textile industry in America, as well as those who have advanced the role and appreciation of textiles in American life.

The Rudolf Smend Collection Batik Fashion/American Style: May 7, 2005 – September 11, 2005

For Immediate Release:
Contact: Lois Frankenberger, publicist
978.470.0040
lfrankenberger@comcast.net

American Textile History Museum Explores the World of Batik in Pair of First Ever US Exhibits Opening May 7, 2005

Tok wi Pasisir, c. 1920, 103 x 88 cm

Tok wi Pasisir, c. 1920, 103 x 88 cm
Photo credit: Bernhard Schaub, Köln

EXHIBITION: Batik from Courts and Palaces:
The Rudolf Smend Collection AND Batik Fashion / American Style
DATES: Sat, May 7 – Sun, September 11, 2005
HOURS: Tuesday – Friday 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.;
Weekends 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays.
PLACE: American Textile History Museum, 491 Dutton Street, Lowell, Mass.
ADMISSION: Free with general Museum admission: $8 adults; $6 students and seniors; free for Museum members and children under 6. Free parking. Free parking. Building is wheelchair accessible.
CALL: 978-441-0400 for exhibit and related events information.

LOWELL– From courts and palaces to American style, the extraordinary art of batik will be showcased in two special exhibitions opening May 7, 2005 at the American Textile History Museum in Lowell, Massachusetts.

The two new exhibits are titled Batik From Courts and Palaces: The Rudolf Smend Collection and Batik Fashion / American Style. Together they explore the rich style and color of batik from its traditional form to its ongoing influence on American contemporary fashion.

Batik From Courts and Palaces features over 35 historic pieces dating from the 1880s to the 1930s. They are on loan from German collector Rudolf G. Smend and include elaborate every day clothing with intricate patterns and color along with special ceremonial textiles created for the highly sophisticated royal courts of central Java and the export market in Sumatra.

“The complexity, color and sheer beauty of the pieces is a testament to the skilled hands of the Javanese batik artists and the high esteem in which their artistic creations were held by royalty,” said Diane Fagan Affleck, director of interpretation at ATHM.

Batik Fashion/American Style focuses on contemporary fashions by several American designers collaborating with Javanese batik artists. Designers featured include: Nicholas Schwaebe of Dunia, Nia Fliam (American) and Agus Ismoyo (Javanese) of Brahma Tirta Sari, Caroline Miksch of Cinnabar Blue, Mary Vaughn Williams and Rudy Huston of White Rice, and Lou Zeldis, Hoffman Fabrics and Nadya Collection.

This installation explores how the artistry of batik has influenced American style both in clothing and home décor. Over 25 pieces made of batik fabric are featured, including dresses and sportswear, shirts, scarves, bags, children’s clothing, and bed covers.

Leesa Hubbell, guest curator of the exhibition, says that Westerners who have made their way to Indonesia, “have found a culturally-charged community of batik experts—human repositories of technical knowledge—who regard the art of batik-making as a blessing passed down from their ancestors. They proudly use this knowledge to create prosperity and cultural value for themselves and their descendants—and for the American entrepreneurs with whom they collaborate.”

The exhibits are presented in connection with the June 7 – 15 World Batik Conference Boston 2005, the first convention in the United States that focuses on batik in its totality.

A catalog of the Smend collection, Batik: Javanese and Sumatran Batiks from Courts and Palaces, is available.

Special batik-themed activities for families with children ages 6 – 12 will run in the Museum’s Textile Learning Center (TLC) from May 7 through September 11.

There will be a preview of the new exhibits at a special Opening Party on Friday evening, May 6. For ticket information, please call 978-441-0400 ext. 247.

“We welcome the opportunity to host these extraordinary exhibits of fashion that carry the batik process forward in history and onto American soil,” said ATHM president and CEO Michael J. Smith.

The American Textile History Museum tells America’s story through the art, history and science of our textiles. Features include the permanent Textiles in America exhibition and children’s Textile Learning Center(TLC); Special Exhibition Gallery and TLC displays. Admission is $8 for adults; $6 for students, seniors and groups; free for children under 6 and Museum members. The Museum is located at 491 Dutton Street in Lowell,adjacent to the Lowell National Historical Park, 35 miles north of Boston off Route I-495. The building is wheelchair accessible, and parking is free. Telephone 978-441-0400. Web: www.athm.org.

Sarong

Sarong
Signature: L. Metz, Pek.
Pekalongan
c. 1890-1900
Photo credit: Bernhard Schaub, Köln

Kudhung

Kudhung
Arabic signature
Cirebon
c. 1900
93 x 238 cm
Photo credit: Brian Brake, Auckland

Kain gendongan Pasisir
Kain gendongan
Pasisir
c. 1900
74 x 265 cm
Photo credit: Bernhard Schaub, Köln

Four Industry Leaders Named to Class of 2004 American Textile Hall of Fame

Induction at American Textile History Museum September 13

Press Contact:
Contact: Lois Frankenberger
978-470-0040
lfrankenberger@comcast.net

LOWELL, September 14 — Industry leaders, friends and families attended yesterday’s luncheon at the American Textile History Museum celebrating the induction of the Class of 2004 to the American Textile Hall of Fame (ATHF). The program, now in its fourth year, honors dedication and commitment to the nation’s textile industry. The ATHF is permanently housed in Lowell, Massachusetts at the American Textile History Museum.

From left: Michael J. Smith ATHM president and CEO; Joseph H. Anderer accepting for the American Viscose Corporation; W. Duke Kimbrell; Gaylon Booker accepting for The National Cotton Council; Jack Lenor Larsen; John H. Pearson, Jr., ATHM board of trustees chairman. (photo: Frank J. Leone, Jr.)

From left: Michael J. Smith ATHM president and CEO;
Joseph H. Anderer accepting for the American Viscose Corporation;
W. Duke Kimbrell; Gaylon Booker accepting for The National Cotton Council;
Jack Lenor Larsen; John H. Pearson, Jr., ATHM board of trustees chairman.
(photo: Frank J. Leone, Jr.)

ATFH board of governors and the Museum board of trustees hosted this year’s luncheon and induction ceremony honoring the Class of 2004. Honorees were: American Viscose Corporation (1922 –1963), whose first plant was in Marcus Hook, PA, was recognized for its early leadership in the field of man-made fibers and its growth into the largest American supplier of rayon ; W. Duke Kimbrell of Gastonia, NC, who has built Parkdale Mills, Inc. into the nation’s largest producer of cotton yarns; Jack Lenor Larsen, a leader in 20th century textile design and technical innovation whose New York design studio grew into a global organization, and who continues to influence 21st century weavers and designers; and The National Cotton Council, established in 1938 and headquartered in Memphis, TN, which provides a strong voice for the American cotton industry from grower to manufacturer.

The program included welcoming remarks by John H. Pearson, Jr., ATHM board of trustees chairman and Michael J. Smith, ATHM president and CEO. The award ceremony featured Joseph H. Anderer accepting the award for the American Viscose Corporation from ATHF board of governors member Arthur M. Spiro, AMS Tex Enterprises, Inc., Great Neck. NY; W. Duke Kimbrell accepting the award from ATHF board of governors chairman James M. Fitzgibbons, retired chairman, Fieldcrest Cannon, Inc., Kannapolis, NC; Jack Lenor Larsen, accepting the award from ATHF board of governors member and ATHM board of trustees vice-chairman Hiram M. Samel, President of Merida Meridian, Boston; and Gaylon Booker, National Cotton Council past president and CEO and current advisor, accepting the award from ATHM board of Trustees member Karl Spilhaus.

The Class of 2004 was selected by the ATHF board of governors which includes Fitzgibbons, of Chestunut Hill, Mass., and retired chairman of Fieldcrest Cannon; Robert E. Coleman, former chairman & CEO, Riegel Textile Corporation and Textile Hall Corporation, Greenville, SC; Robert Dalton, Jr., Tech-Tex, Inc., Charlotte, NC; W. Duke Kimbrell, chairman & CEO, Parkdale Inc., Gastonia, NC; Joseph L. Lanier, Jr., chairman & CEO, Dan River Inc., Danville,VA; Hiram M. Samel, president, Merida Meridian, Boston, MA and ATHM board of trustees vice-chairman; Arthur M. Spiro, AMS Tex Enterprises Inc., Great Neck, NY. Edward B. Stevens, chairman, Ames Textile Corp., Lowell, MA, ex-officio member and ATHM board of trustees chairman emeritus.

Commenting on the new inductees, James M. Fitzgibbons, chairman of the ATHF board of governors, said “We are honored to welcome these leaders. They have made an important difference in the textile industry, and we offer them a place in the American Textile Hall of Fame to tell their story to future generations.”

The American Textile Hall of Fame, established in 2001 with a board of governors appointed by the Museum’s board of trustees, honors past and present individuals, corporations and institutions that have made significant contributions to the textile industry in America as well as those who have advanced the role and appreciation of textiles in American life. Members of the inaugural class were industry leader Roger Milliken, Chairman and CEO of Milliken & Company; textile pioneer Samuel Slater (1768-1835); and energy supplier to the Carolinas Duke Power. The Class of 2002 included E. I. Du Pont de Nemours and Company, Frederick B. Dent, James Spencer Love, and Whitin Machine Works. Class of 2003 inductees included Dalton McMichael, Sr., (1914 – 2001) of Madison, NC; and The Draper Corporation, (1816 – 1980) of Hopedale, MA.

The American Textile History Museum focuses on the art, science and history of our textiles, and is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive textile museum. It is located in the historic Kitson Manufacturing Company building in Lowell, MA, and houses nationally significant collections of books and documents, tools and textile machines, fabric samples, textiles, and costumes. The Museum features the ongoing Textiles In America exhibit, and an active program of changing exhibits supported by educational programming for schools and the general public. It also operates the Textile Conservation Center which provides textile.

Sovereign Bank Awards Grant to the American Textile History Museum in Lowell

Contribution Will Support the Museum’s “Threads of Learning” Education Program

Media Contact:
Ellen Molle
617.757.5573
Cell: 617.548.9932
emolle@sovereignbank.com

Boston-July 20th, 2004 — Sovereign Bank strengthened its support for education and the arts in Merrimack Valley this morning with a grant to the American Textile History Museum. Bank executives joined with museum officials at a ceremony in Lowell where they presented a $5,000 grant from the Sovereign Bank Foundation.

Sovereign Bank

“Education is a key contributor to the future success of today’s youth,” said Bill Hardy, Merrimack Valley regional manager for Sovereign Bank. “Sovereign understands this and salutes the American Textile History Museum for their outstanding efforts to expand educational opportunities to all communities.”

The grant will be directed toward the museum’s “Threads of Learning” program. The funds will be used to provide bus transportation for 20 school groups of disadvantaged youth to visit the museum. During their visits, students will have the opportunity to take part in several classes that arm them with the skills to achieve better test scores in critical subjects. In addition, the classes will teach students how to develop critical thinking skills, as well provide a forum to discuss important topics — such as problem solving and cultural awareness. All classes through the program are structured to complement classroom teachings.

“We thank Sovereign Bank for this important support. The museum’s education program has expanded rapidly. Sovereign Bank has enabled us to overcome an obstacle to providing even more children with math, science, social studies and history programs taught through the study of textiles. We look forward to another year of service to school children,” said Michael Smith, president and CEO, the American Textile History Museum.

Accepting the $5,000 grant on behalf of the museum was Smith and chairman of the museum’s board of trustees John H. Pearson, Jr and Director of Education, Linda Carpenter.

The Sovereign Bank Foundation, through its “Spirit of Your Neighborhood Campaign,” supports non-profit organizations with charitable grants with the mission of making a difference in youth and educational programs as well as community and economic programs. Last year over 500 community organizations received more than $3 million through the Sovereign Bank Foundation.

The American Textile History Museum focuses on the art, science and history of our textiles, and is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive textile museum. It is located in the historic Kitson Manufacturing Company building in Lowell, MA, and houses nationally significant collections of books and documents, tools and textile machines, fabric samples, textiles, and costumes. The Museum features the ongoing Textiles In America exhibit, and an active program of changing exhibits supported by educational programming for schools and the general public. It also operates the Textile Conservation Center, which provides textile care and preservation services to museums, institutions, corporations, and private clients worldwide.

Sovereign Bancorp, Inc., (“Sovereign”) (NYSE: SOV), headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the parent company of Sovereign Bank, a $47 billion financial institution with 535 community banking offices, nearly 900 ATMs and about 8,300 team members in Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. In addition to full-service retail banking, Sovereign offers a broad array of financial services and products including business and corporate banking, cash management, capital markets, trust and wealth management, and insurance. Pro forma for our pending acquisitions, Sovereign is one of the top 20 largest banking institutions in the United States. For more information on Sovereign Bank, visit www.sovereignbank.com or call 1-877-SOV-BANK.

Sovereign Bank Community Banking Offices in the Lowell area:
Billerica 508 Boston Road
Chelmsford 44 Central Square
Dracut 1985 Lakeview Avenue
Lowell 900 Chelmsford Street *
794 Rogers Street *
489 Merrimack Street & City Hall
170 Merrimack Street
One Wood Street
Tewksbury 1866 Main Street
* Former First Essex branch
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